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The result of grinding coffee beans, used to prepare the many beverages based on coffee that have been developed since long ago.

3
votes
You don‘t need the advice of coffee drinkers, you need advice from a plumber (which I am admittedly not, but I have enough contacts in the industry) and a gardener to chime in. In short: Don’t do it. …
answered Feb 19 by Stephie
1
vote
I wouldn’t attempt to dry wet grounds - the quality would likely suffer and for brewing they will be made wet again, which would make the drying step moot. Just use them straight from the fridge (as d …
answered Apr 19 by Stephie
1
vote
The standard refrigerator temperature most official websites assume are around 4C. Yes, there are different temperature zones in home refrigerators, but that’s included in the general recommendation o …
answered Apr 19 by Stephie
9
votes
I will not go into any political discussion, theory or similar, but I can give you a few historical facts. There have always been times in the last few centuries when coffee was a rare commodity. And …
answered Nov 26 '15 by Stephie
7
votes
The drip-type coffee is available in many countries in Europe. A list of names: Filterkaffee in Germany / Austria / Switzerland filterkaffe in Denmark and Sweden filterkoffie in the Netherlands kaw …
answered Nov 13 '15 by Stephie
10
votes
Is it possible that you read a few posts on the Internet the wrong way? The grounds will not disappear, if anything they will appear "more", volume-wise because they swell in the hot water. There ar …
answered May 9 '16 by Stephie
9
votes
It boils down to taste - some people even chew whole beans. Safety-wise there are no concerns1 and the method you propose is not unheard of, it goes by the term "Cowboy coffee" and others. Some prep …
answered Nov 16 '15 by Stephie
8
votes
Probably closest to an espresso is an AeroPress, which is similar to a French press, but uses manual pressure to extract more aromatic componds while being lower on bitter and sour notes than most oth …
answered Oct 30 '15 by Stephie
1
vote
Define bland... If you compare just-ground to ground last evening and left open, yes, as a connoisseur you will probably notice a difference. Comparing store-bought pre-ground coffee, a few hours i …
answered Nov 8 '17 by Stephie
3
votes
5answers
We bought a pack of coffee and had it ground on site, like many times before. The new sales girl must have misunderstood something and used a too-fine setting, finest (for espresso) instead of second …
asked Jan 29 '17 by Stephie
5
votes
In this case, my usual pre-coffee tiredness solved the problem: I had planned to mix the espresso grind with my usual grind to minimize the total amount of grounds in the cup. The idea was 1/2 too- …
answered Feb 1 '17 by Stephie
1
vote
From a food safety perspective, three to four days should be fine. For longer periods, simply freeze them. But... Wet beans will likely clog up your grinder and it’s probably not a good choice, flavo …
answered Apr 14 by Stephie
2
votes
I am afraid that there are two misconceptions One, what you have in the jar are not coffee beans, it’s freeze-dried prepared coffee. Think of it as the coffee equivalent of bullion cubes. Two, the d …
answered May 8 by Stephie