5

I've heard that coffee contains small amounts of several vitamins/minerals and even worse, it can interfere with iron absorption and wipes out B vitamins.

Does coffee has any vitamins & minerals which are essential to life?

In example: Coffea arabica

  • Why the arabica tag? What about this question is species-specific? – speedfranklin Feb 19 '15 at 16:27
  • @speedfranklin I didn't want it to be too broad, so I've placed the most common coffee as example, but I'm not restricting my question only to this one. – kenorb Feb 19 '15 at 16:46
  • I would imagine it would be more different for brewing method (e.g. french press vs. filter) than for bean species, if you can even find research that specific. I don't think it's too broad without it, but that's just my opinion :) – speedfranklin Feb 19 '15 at 22:08
5

Here are some nutritional information for brewed coffee that list macro- and micro-nutrients such as those you list:

Looks like there are traces of various B vitamins, a fair amount of riboflavin (B2), and traces of minerals such as magnesium, phosphorous, and potassium.

All of this nutrition data will certainly depend on the origin, roast, preparation methods, and other factors, which affect what gets into the cup from the beans. Unless you're eating the beans...

  • For more on specific mineral/vitamin/nutrient interactions in general, you might want to seek a different site, such as Biology. – hoc_age Feb 14 '15 at 15:51
2

I ain't a specialist or health expert, but here seems to be a very helpful site: Coffee, brewed from grounds, prepared with tap water, Nutritional Facts & Calories.

Gives you all the data you need for nutrition value in coffee. According to the site, coffee might be healthier than you think:

This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Pantothenic Acid, and a very good source of Riboflavin.

Some of these must be very familiar eh? It is also better at weight losing that gaining :-). No need to throw coffee away because of a diet. Like hoc_age♦ said:

All of this nutrition data will certainly depend on the origin, roast, preparation methods, and other factors, which affect what gets into the cup from the beans. Unless you're eating the beans...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.