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I own a drip coffee pot: enter image description here

and one of the other things you can buy is a thin spouted kettle which is used for pouring water one to the grounds.

What is the theory behind this?

Does the rate of water delivery/flow just agitate the suspension of coffee/water in a way that is better?

I also see such items being used in coffee shops too so would really like an expert's summation on this.

  • 1
    This seems to be about pour-overs rather than drip coffee. – Joshua Aslan Smith Jan 27 '15 at 20:57
  • @JoshuaAslanSmith we call it drip coffee in UK and in Japan – EdChum Jan 27 '15 at 20:58
  • interesting, in the US drip coffee specifically refers to traditional coffee brewing machines where water is heated to boiling and then dripped over the grounds and filter and then after extraction drifts into a pot below (like an office coffee pot or one in a greasy spoon). – Joshua Aslan Smith Jan 27 '15 at 21:00
  • @JoshuaAslanSmith we call those filter coffees, to be honest drip coffee is a Japanese term but I have seen it used in some UK espresso shops it's a fairly recent-ish thing here but has been around for a while in Japan and is very popular there – EdChum Jan 27 '15 at 21:02
  • 1
    I'll post a meta about it so we can come to a consensus about which term we will use as a community and then set that as the description in the tag wiki. – Joshua Aslan Smith Jan 27 '15 at 21:18
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By having a thin spout, you can more finely control the flow rate and where the water lands. When making pour-over coffee, you want to control the water level in the cone to control the brew time and evenly extract coffee. Also, water needs to be poured carefully onto the middle of the cone so that the water doesn't run down the side of the cone without touching the coffee grounds.

  • 1
    +1 It's all about the control! – stevvve Jan 28 '15 at 17:51

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