1

I wanted to know how to improve my brewing practices.

I make my daily cup out of a drip brew machine, but I find inconsistency in my flavours every time. I get my beans ground from a local shop and they tend to lose their potency after one week and seem little stale and bitter. What should I do in order to get a consistent cup every time?

closed as primarily opinion-based by MTSan, Anthony Pham, Ecnerwal, Kyle Macey, Shiri Jul 21 '17 at 14:57

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    From the story you've told, I can assure you that you should keep coffee freshness consistent to keep the taste of cup consistent. Any change to the rest of the system seems oblivious. – MTSan Jul 6 '17 at 13:27
  • Just asking to be sure: with "potency", you refer to the flavor and not the caffeine effect, right? The latter should not be affected by age so much. – DCTLib Jul 6 '17 at 13:31
  • 1
    I might be wrong but I find this question kinda broad and opinion based, especially given the first sentence as "good" and "frowned upon" are quite subjective terms. – Anthony Pham Jul 6 '17 at 13:34
  • Agree with MT San. Whole bean coffee will keep much more consistently than ground. Grind before brewing if possible to keep best flavor. I can get consistent flavor measuring by volume, but that's just because I've used the same scoop for a long time and can scoop almost exactly 7g scoops without thinking about it. My wife on the other hand has to measure on a scale. Weighing grounds may help consistency. – Nate M. Jul 7 '17 at 14:34
4

The problem doesn't seem to be in your brewing practices but in the way you store your coffee.

Roasted coffee starts to stale soon after the resting/degassing period ends. Ideally you ought to store your coffee in a vacuum-sealed container that won’t impart unwanted flavors to your coffee.

Placing your coffee into the fridge, as many people do, isn't usually a good idea. The fridge is not cold enough to keep the coffee fresh and the coffee will absorbs odors and moisture.

One solution, in addition to better sealing your coffee, would be to buy whole beans and grind your coffee before you use it instead of grinding a week's worth of coffee at one time.

1

Consistency in preparation is always key in any brewing technique aside from proper storage of beans - weighing all your components (beans and water) is one of the best places to start

This website might help as well

http://www.artisancoffee.cn/2016/12/coffee-brewing-tips/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.