2 Improved formatting.
source | link
  1. Coffee enthusiasts & aficionados identify acidity as the dry, bright & sparkling sensation that sets a high-quality, high-grown coffee apart from a mundane, lower-grown coffee. Admittedly, this is the rather snooty way of looking at the issue, though it is true that many highly-prized coffees are grown at high elevation & are characterized by their bright, nuanced qualities.

  2. On the scientific side, acidity is something to be measured on the pH scale, which uses 7.0 as an indicator of neutrality, numbers under 7 as more acidic & numbers above 7 as lower-acid (or basic). Lemon juice registers at about 2.0; milk at 6.5. A typical higher-acid breakfast blend coffee might land somewhere around 4.7. (Note that "black coffee" is marked on the scale below as a 5; this is an average & certainly not universal.)

  3. The amount of chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a natural chemical compound which is the ester of caffeic acid and (-)-quinic acid can also determine acidity.

The first one is definitely opinion based, the second one differs from blend to blend, from area to area. Because the acidity of the bean is directly proportional to the pH of the soil where the blend is grown. The third one divides your choice into two categories, Robusta and Arabica, with Arabica having a lower CGA. My choice for a optimal coffee would be the Arabica variety somewhere from south-west South America, Middle East, eastern Europe or west Asia.

Sourced from Wikipedia's article: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:World_Soil_pH World Soil pH.svg and http://www.highergroundstrading.com/blog/38/coffee-acidityCoffee Acidity:-the-science-and-the-experience-- the Science & the Experience .

Just for motivation and joblessness: THIS IS FOR MORALE BOOST

  1. Coffee enthusiasts & aficionados identify acidity as the dry, bright & sparkling sensation that sets a high-quality, high-grown coffee apart from a mundane, lower-grown coffee. Admittedly, this is the rather snooty way of looking at the issue, though it is true that many highly-prized coffees are grown at high elevation & are characterized by their bright, nuanced qualities.

  2. On the scientific side, acidity is something to be measured on the pH scale, which uses 7.0 as an indicator of neutrality, numbers under 7 as more acidic & numbers above 7 as lower-acid (or basic). Lemon juice registers at about 2.0; milk at 6.5. A typical higher-acid breakfast blend coffee might land somewhere around 4.7. (Note that "black coffee" is marked on the scale below as a 5; this is an average & certainly not universal.)

  3. The amount of chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a natural chemical compound which is the ester of caffeic acid and (-)-quinic acid can also determine acidity.

The first one is definitely opinion based, the second one differs from blend to blend, from area to area. Because the acidity of the bean is directly proportional to the pH of the soil where the blend is grown. The third one divides your choice into two categories, Robusta and Arabica, with Arabica having a lower CGA. My choice for a optimal coffee would be the Arabica variety somewhere from south-west South America, Middle East, eastern Europe or west Asia.

Sourced from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:World_Soil_pH.svg and http://www.highergroundstrading.com/blog/38/coffee-acidity:-the-science-and-the-experience--

Just for motivation and joblessness: THIS IS FOR MORALE BOOST

  1. Coffee enthusiasts & aficionados identify acidity as the dry, bright & sparkling sensation that sets a high-quality, high-grown coffee apart from a mundane, lower-grown coffee. Admittedly, this is the rather snooty way of looking at the issue, though it is true that many highly-prized coffees are grown at high elevation & are characterized by their bright, nuanced qualities.

  2. On the scientific side, acidity is something to be measured on the pH scale, which uses 7.0 as an indicator of neutrality, numbers under 7 as more acidic & numbers above 7 as lower-acid (or basic). Lemon juice registers at about 2.0; milk at 6.5. A typical higher-acid breakfast blend coffee might land somewhere around 4.7. (Note that "black coffee" is marked on the scale below as a 5; this is an average & certainly not universal.)

  3. The amount of chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a natural chemical compound which is the ester of caffeic acid and (-)-quinic acid can also determine acidity.

The first one is definitely opinion based, the second one differs from blend to blend, from area to area. Because the acidity of the bean is directly proportional to the pH of the soil where the blend is grown. The third one divides your choice into two categories, Robusta and Arabica, with Arabica having a lower CGA. My choice for a optimal coffee would be the Arabica variety somewhere from south-west South America, Middle East, eastern Europe or west Asia.

Sourced from Wikipedia's article: File: World Soil pH.svg and Coffee Acidity: the Science & the Experience .

Just for motivation and joblessness: THIS IS FOR MORALE BOOST

1
source | link

  1. Coffee enthusiasts & aficionados identify acidity as the dry, bright & sparkling sensation that sets a high-quality, high-grown coffee apart from a mundane, lower-grown coffee. Admittedly, this is the rather snooty way of looking at the issue, though it is true that many highly-prized coffees are grown at high elevation & are characterized by their bright, nuanced qualities.

  2. On the scientific side, acidity is something to be measured on the pH scale, which uses 7.0 as an indicator of neutrality, numbers under 7 as more acidic & numbers above 7 as lower-acid (or basic). Lemon juice registers at about 2.0; milk at 6.5. A typical higher-acid breakfast blend coffee might land somewhere around 4.7. (Note that "black coffee" is marked on the scale below as a 5; this is an average & certainly not universal.)

  3. The amount of chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a natural chemical compound which is the ester of caffeic acid and (-)-quinic acid can also determine acidity.

The first one is definitely opinion based, the second one differs from blend to blend, from area to area. Because the acidity of the bean is directly proportional to the pH of the soil where the blend is grown. The third one divides your choice into two categories, Robusta and Arabica, with Arabica having a lower CGA. My choice for a optimal coffee would be the Arabica variety somewhere from south-west South America, Middle East, eastern Europe or west Asia.

Sourced from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:World_Soil_pH.svg and http://www.highergroundstrading.com/blog/38/coffee-acidity:-the-science-and-the-experience--

Just for motivation and joblessness: THIS IS FOR MORALE BOOST